Alexandra Andriolo

Alexandra Andriolo
Position: 
Senior Research Officer, Native Title Research Unit

Alexandra Andriolo (nee Muir) joined AIATSIS in 2012 and is the Native Title Research and Access Officer. Alexandra has a BA (International Relations) (Hons Applied Linguistics) and has worked in the Indigenous research sector for 5 years. Her background is in linguistics and archival research.

Alexandra’s research interests include using historical documents for evidence in native title claims, socio linguistics and perceptions of language use, document access and management, as well as archival research. 

Alexandra is the first point of contact for people seeking information about native title resources held in the AIATSIS collections. In addition, Alexandra is a research officer on a range of other native title projects.

Publications 
  • Andriolo, A, 2016, Guidelines for managing information in native title, in Native Title Newsletter December 2016, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra.
  • McGrath, P, Dinkler, L & Andriolo, A 2015, Managing information in native title: survey and workshop report, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra.
  • Tran, T & Andriolo, A, 2015, Native title rights and interest in Indigenous Protected Area Management: the Martu and Nyangumarta experience, in Native Title Newsletter August 2015, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra.
  • Andriolo, A, 2015, An Interview with Gail Reynolds-Adamson and Annie Dabb: Esperence Tjaltjraak Native Title Aboriginal Corporation, in Native Title Newsletter August 2015, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra.
  • Andriolo, A, 2015, Native Title Research and Access Service, in Native Title Newsletter August 2015, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra.
  • Muir, A, 2012 (honours thesis, ANU). If the I’s have it, is it the death of me: The debated use of first person pronouns in coordinate noun phrases in object position.